What do Zombies, The Clap and Nipple Rings Have In Common? Gloria Allred

 

Gloria Allred Is Representing The Miami Zombie Cannibal's Girlfriend

Gloria Allred, Hollywood’s own media eating cannibal,  has confirmed that she is representing the South Beach Cannibal’s girlfriend. The Miami Cannibal Zombie Rudy Eugene has dominated the news since memorial Day weekend, when he was shot and killed by police after ripping a homeless man apart and eating the flesh right off of his face.

Gloria Allred is known for taking high-profile and often controversial cases, particularly those involving the protection of women’s rights.  Some of the notable cases Ms. Allred has handled over the years include:

Sues Actor For Giving Girlfriend The Clap – On July 19, 2007, she filed a lawsuit in Superior Court on behalf of Elizabeth Mazzocchi against actor Esai Morales for “intentional and negligent transmission of a sexually transmitted disease, assault, battery, and breach of contract.”

Nipple Ring Humiliation Case – She represented Mandi Hamlin in a March 2008 complaint against the TSA. Hamlin was reported to have been humiliated when she was made to take off her nipple rings in a Lubbock, Texas, airport.

Eugene’s girlfriend who is now being represented by Gloria Allred (god only knows why — a movie deal maybe?) believes Eugene was drugged unknowingly or that someone put a voodoo curse on him. Rudy Eugene is Haitian, and Zombies have a long tradition in Haitian culture.

According to a Wikipedia article on Zombies:

A zombie (Haitian Creole: zonbi; North Mbundu: nzumbe) is an animated corpse brought back to life by mystical means, such as witchcraft.  The term is often figuratively applied to describe a hypnotized person bereft of consciousness and self-awareness, yet ambulant and able to respond to surrounding stimuli. Since the late 19th century, zombies have acquired notable popularity, especially in North American and European folklore.

In 1937, while researching folklore in Haiti, Zora Neale Hurston encountered the case of a woman who appeared in a village, and a family claimed she was Felicia Felix-Mentor, a relative who had died and been buried in 1907 at the age of 29. Hurston pursued rumors that the affected persons were given a powerful psychoactive drug, but she was unable to locate individuals willing to offer much information. She wrote:
What is more, if science ever gets to the bottom of Voodoo in Haiti and Africa, it will be found that some important medical secrets, still unknown to medical science, give it its power, rather than gestures of ceremony.

Several decades later, Wade Davis, a Harvard ethnobotanist, presented a pharmacological case for zombies in two books, The Serpent and the Rainbow (1985) and Passage of Darkness: The Ethnobiology of the Haitian Zombie (1988). Davis traveled to Haiti in 1982 and, as a result of his investigations, claimed that a living person can be turned into a zombie by two special powders being introduced into the blood stream (usually via a wound). The first, coup de poudre (French: “powder strike”), includes tetrodotoxin (TTX), a powerful and frequently fatal neurotoxin found in the flesh of the pufferfish (order Tetraodontidae). The second powder consists of dissociative drugs such as datura. Together, these powders were said to induce a death-like state in which the will of the victim would be entirely subjected to that of the bokor. Davis also popularized the story of Clairvius Narcisse, who was claimed to have succumbed to this practice.

The process described by Davis was an initial state of death-like suspended animation, followed by re-awakening — typically after being buried — into a psychotic state. The psychosis induced by the drug and psychological trauma was hypothesised by Davis to re-inforce culturally-learned beliefs and to cause the individual to reconstruct their identity as that of a zombie, since they “knew” they were dead, and had no other role to play in the Haitian society. Societal reinforcement of the belief was hypothesized by Davis to confirm for the zombie individual the zombie state, and such individuals were known to hang around in graveyards, exhibiting attitudes of low affect.

Davis’s claim has been criticized, particularly the suggestion that Haitian witch doctors can keep “zombies” in a state of pharmacologically induced trance for many years. Symptoms of TTX poisoning range from numbness and nausea to paralysis — particularly of the muscles of the diaphragm — unconsciousness, and death, but do not include a stiffened gait or a death-like trance. According to psychologist Terence Hines, the scientific community dismisses tetrodotoxin as the cause of this state, and Davis’ assessment of the nature of the reports of Haitian zombies is viewed as overly credulous.

Scottish psychiatrist R. D. Laing highlighted the link between social and cultural expectations and compulsion, in the context of schizophrenia and other mental illness, suggesting that schizogenesis may account for some of the psychological aspects of zombification.

Link to story

Haitian Voodoo curse and gloria Allred … WaZaap with that?

Hollywood Swing’n baby … time to make some money off the Hollywood zombie masses … that’s WaZaap with that!

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